stilllifequickheart:

Lucile Parker
White Lillies 
20th century


Not lilies at all, but Datura…

solanum melanocerasum on Flickr.

Garden huckleberry. Fruit can be boiled down with generous amounts of sugar to make a substitute for blueberries. Solanum burbankii, the sunberry or wonderberry, is naturally much sweeter than garden huckleberry.

Seen at the University of Washington Medicinal Herb Garden.

thepoisondiaries:

“The Berries of the Belladonna plant are beautiful I have always thought so. I string the plump black pearls on silk thread and wear them around my neck if they were not so deadly. The seeds are nearly as poisonous as the berries; father has warned me a thousand times.” The Poison Diaries

(via theherbarium)

Brugmansia flowers on a moonlit evening in Gimhae, South Korea, in 2008.

mondonoir:

Judith McMillan

Optic Exploration: Brugmansia x candida (Angel’s Trumpet), 2000

Gelatin silver print, toned

(via destina-terre)

fuckyeahplantae:

flowerfood:

nightshade brains on Flickr.

Datura seeds in a half-dry pod

This plant is so cool! Datura stramonium, also known as Datura, Jimson Weed, Thornapple, Devil’s Apple, Devil’s Trumpet, or Mad-apple, is a plant in the Solanaceae (nightshade) family. It has been used in herbal medicine to treat asthma symptoms and as an analgesic. The plant is also a powerful hallucinogen and can be fatally toxic if ingested above medicinal dosage.

I want to note that Datura can act as a powerful deliriant, not a “regular” hallucinogen. Hallucinogenic experience can be considered an augmentation or distortion of reality that a person (more or less) navigates with conscious awareness. Deliriants can remove reality and conscious awareness from the equation completely.

I’m of the opinion that no one should ever ingest any part of Datura with the intention to get high or see pretty color trails. If the alkaloids contained within these plants don’t end up killing the person that ingests them, then she or he stands to have to endure intense cognitive dissociations, highly increased heart rate, fluctuation in body temperature and compromised circulatory function, possible organ and/or brain damage, painful sensitivity to light owing to acute dilation of pupils, and perhaps amnesia… all of which can last for three or four days, with other side effects lasting for weeks (source 1, source 2; there are many more if you check).

Daturas are my favorite group of plants, and I’m very familiar with their use (along with other nightshades) in magic, shamanism and witchcraft. But the only intoxication I recommend with them is a deep whiff of their newly opened flowers.

A Green Zebra tomato that I cut in half and marveled at a couple of nights ago.

thepoisondiaries:

Historically Henbane was used in a combination with other plants, such as mandrake, deadly nightshade, and datura as an anaesthetic potion, as well as for its psychoactive properties in “magic brews.”
These psychoactive properties include visual hallucinations and a sensation of flight. Hyoscyamine,scopolamine, and other tropane alkaloids have been found in the foliage and seeds of the plant. 
All parts of the plant is poisonous, if ingested symptoms can include hallucinations, dilated pupils, restlessness, and flushed skin, convulsions and vomiting. Henbane can be toxic, and even fatal, to animals in low doses.

thepoisondiaries:

Historically Henbane was used in a combination with other plants, such as mandrakedeadly nightshade, and datura as an anaesthetic potion, as well as for its psychoactive properties in “magic brews.”

These psychoactive properties include visual hallucinations and a sensation of flight. Hyoscyamine,scopolamine, and other tropane alkaloids have been found in the foliage and seeds of the plant. 

All parts of the plant is poisonous, if ingested symptoms can include hallucinations, dilated pupils, restlessness, and flushed skin, convulsions and vomiting. Henbane can be toxic, and even fatal, to animals in low doses.

Solanum pyracanthon, also known as the Porcupine Tomato, is an evergreen shrub native to tropical Madagascar and the islands of the western Indian Ocean of the genus Solanum, a diverse and cosmopolitan family of plants with over 1,500 members including the tomato, potato and nightshades. The plant contains various toxic tropane alkaloids in its leaves, stem and fruit and therefore should be considered dangerous to humans. S. pyracanthon is perhaps most distinguished by a profusion of strong, straight fluorescent orange thorns which occupy the stems and leaves of the plant, giving it a foreboding appearance.”