Flowers, Food + Forage

Oct 20

Hi Biodivseed, have you been following the debate about a 'TTIP' between the USA and EU? Whereas concerns from Supermiljöbloggen and others, point towards a higher control with seeds/biomaterial. Plainly it may include laws against "uncertified" (read: no

(Source: hewasindigo, via plantplantplantplantplant)

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae) “Red Devil” by John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG) on Flickr.Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae) “Red Devil”

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae) “Red Devil” by John Horstman (itchydogimages, SINOBUG) on Flickr.

Stinging Nettle Slug Caterpillar (Cup Moth, Setora sp., Limacodidae) “Red Devil”

Passiflora amalocarpa Barb.Rodr. by Andre_Cardoso on Flickr.Passiflora amalocarpa Barb.Rodr.

Passiflora amalocarpa Barb.Rodr. by Andre_Cardoso on Flickr.

Passiflora amalocarpa Barb.Rodr.

[video]

libutron:

Clustered Toughshank - Collybia confluens
Collybia confluens (Marasmiaceae) is a decomposer of both hardwood and conifer litter, recognized by its crowded gills, quickly fading cap, tendency to grow in loose clusters, and its distinctive stem, which is covered with a fine whitish fuzz and is quite long in proportion to the width of the cap.
This mushroom is recorded as ‘edible but worthless’ in many field guides, the cap flesh is so thin and insubstantial and the stems so tough that they are not worth considering as a culinary collectible.
This species occurs in most temperate countries on Europe,Asia, and in many parts of North America.
Synonym: Gymnopus confluens
References: [1] - [2]
Photo credit: ©Claude-Alain Berdoz | Locality: not indicated

libutron:

Clustered Toughshank - Collybia confluens

Collybia confluens (Marasmiaceae) is a decomposer of both hardwood and conifer litter, recognized by its crowded gills, quickly fading cap, tendency to grow in loose clusters, and its distinctive stem, which is covered with a fine whitish fuzz and is quite long in proportion to the width of the cap.

This mushroom is recorded as ‘edible but worthless’ in many field guides, the cap flesh is so thin and insubstantial and the stems so tough that they are not worth considering as a culinary collectible.

This species occurs in most temperate countries on Europe,Asia, and in many parts of North America.

Synonym: Gymnopus confluens

References: [1] - [2]

Photo credit: ©Claude-Alain Berdoz | Locality: not indicated

(via cassieeissacsplantpages)

[video]

orchid-a-day:

Stenoglottis longifolia
October 20, 2014

orchid-a-day:

Stenoglottis longifolia

October 20, 2014

(via the-secret-life-of-plants)

[video]

orandagirl:

Mushroom walk! #fungi #fall #fairy #apartments (at Tomorrow River)

orandagirl:

Mushroom walk! #fungi #fall #fairy #apartments (at Tomorrow River)

(via mycology)

silentfrost:

‘“Zapfen”-stäubling’ by IngoR

silentfrost:

‘“Zapfen”-stäubling’ by IngoR

(via mycology)

“Most consumers seem to want superfoods like ‘Açaí from the Amazon,’ ‘Inca Berries from Peru,’ ‘Goji Berries from China’ and ‘Cloudberries from Finland’ because they want some sort of miracle silver bullet, harvested from deep in the jungle, or gathered from the top of the purest mountain. It’s fetishistic, in the anthropological sense of the word: you’re the Don Quixote of the health food store, searching for the right combination of exotic antioxidants, that will let you live forever.

Nobody seems to want to hear that red cabbage will accomplish almost all the same things these ‘magical’ berries will, for a fraction of the sugar, and 1/20th of the price. For some people, when superfoods are staring at them in the grocery store for $1.99, it seems too easy.” —

biodiverseed

The power of marketing, as it applies to produce:

"Quinoa may deliver a complete protein—all of the amino acids you require—in a compact package, but rice and beans together actually do better. And like goji berries, blueberries and strawberries are packed with phytochemicals. The only problem is that lacking an exotic back story, food marketers can’t wring as exorbitant a markup from these staples: The domestic blueberry, for example, is periodically (and justifiably) marketed as a superfood, and in 2012, products featuring blueberries as a primary ingredient saw their sales nearly quadruple. But they only raked in $3.5 million—less than 2 percent of açaí-based product sales.

-Tom Philpott, "Are Quinoa, Chia Seeds, and other ‘Superfoods’ a Scam?" (from Mother Jones)

The lesson? Find your local superfoods. I assure you they are just as good. But, if you must have your Inca and Goji berries, it’s a hell of a better price point to grow them yourself.

(via biodiverseed)

greekabyss:

Bangkok, Thailand. 

greekabyss:

Bangkok, Thailand. 

(via indefenseofplants)